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An Article Reflection

Running head AN ARTICLE REFLECTION 1

AnArticle Reflection

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Uponreading the article, “The Mind at Midlife,” my initial reactionto the content was that of relief. My previous conviction that themind deteriorates upon attaining middle adulthood was disapproved,and I discovered that the mind only becomes calmer, it rewires itselfto acquires new abilities, and better able to adapt to socialsituations (Philips, 2011).

Self-conceptis affected in that as people enter the middle age, they becomecalmer and less neurotic, emotional storms quieten and they becomestable. Cognitively, they improve and tend to focus more on thepositive information, adults in this group do not let problems inlife take center stage in their lives. They tend to remember positiveimages, encounters, and become better at judging the true intentionsof other human beings. Adults here possess a better understanding ofthe economy and make better financial decisions (Philips, 2011).

Thearticle made sense in that it depicts middle adulthood as the primetime for economic growth, major social relations and better cognitivehealth because it has informed my aspirations of being financiallyindependent by reserving my major investment decisions to be made ata given time in life. I will raise a family before entering themiddle adulthood so that during my child’s adolescence, I will bebetter equipped to deal with situations, and act rationally to thetantrums of puberty.

Byreading this article, my perspective on the human mind has beenenlightened to understand that I can preserve my cognitive abilitythrough my old age. There is a probability of declining skills, butstill, there is hope for an improvement in cognitive, physical, andsocial dimensions of my life. The article resonates to my father’slife during his young age he had tried to be happy with afrustrating life to no avail. But with old age, he has becomecontented and satisfied.

References

Phillips,&nbspM.&nbspL.(2011, April). The mind at midlife. Retrieved fromhttp://www.apa.org/monitor/2011/04/mind-midlife.aspx