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Death Penalties

DeathPenalties

DeathPenalties

Historyof in Texas

Thefirst execution to go on record was in 1819, that of George Brown forpiracy charges. Before the statehood of Texas in 1846, eighteenexecutions had happened, and all were by hanging. Hanging was useduntil 1924, with the last hanging happening in Brazoria County (InPetersilia, 2015).The change in execution laws happened in 1923, and with the hangingwas replaced by an electric chair. 361 people have faced execution inTexas, with the latest being in 1964. The US Supreme Court, in Furmanv. Georgia case, made it unconstitutional for any state to executethe victims (InPetersilia, 2015).However, a Supreme Court decision in the Gregg v. Georgia in 1976imposed back the death penalty punishment. Texas then executed thefirst man to be executed by lethal injection in the world, in 1982.The reason as to why Texas has higher numbers in executions thatother states is probably of the federal appellate structure, wherethe appeals from Texas end up in the United States Court of Appealsfor the Fifth Circuit, which is more differential to the popularwishes (InPetersilia, 2015).

Historyof Death Penalty in New York

Capitalpunishment was last used in Sing Sing Prison in 1963, and the statewas the first to use an electric chair in executions (InPetersilia, 2015).Following the declaration of the unconstitutional nature ofexecutions in the Furman v. Georgia case, New York lacked a deathpenalty until in 1995. In the same year, Governor George Patakisigned a new law that legalized execution by lethal injection (InPetersilia, 2015).The law was contested in court in 2004, in the People v. LaValle casearguing that lethal injection violated the constitution of the state.Legislation to amend current statutes have failed, and the state nolonger consults the death sentences. However, certain crimes fallunder the power of federal government and are subject to federaldeath penalty (InPetersilia, 2015).

Reference

InPetersilia, J., &amp In Reitz, K. R. (2015).&nbspTheOxford handbook of sentencing and corrections.