• Uncategorized

Personal and School Assessment Literacy

Personaland School Assessment Literacy

Personaland School Assessment Literacy

Teachershave always done assessments to get feedback from their students andin other platforms they are assessed by education officials. It isimportant for practicing teachers to carry out self-assessment toevaluate their capabilities in various criteria to get information onareas that need improvement. Assessment literacy refers to theconnection of teacher assessment to components of teaching andlearning (Kahl,Hofman, and Bryant, 2013).This process can be easy and beneficial if teachers matched theteaching objectives to the assessment tools. If a teacher isassessment-literate, interpreting self-administered survey ispossible. I undertook a self-assessment survey to measure assessmentpractices in my school. The process was enlightening as I learned anumber of important areas in personal assessment literacy and schoolassessment practices. This paper details the results of the survey.

Part1: Personal Assessment Literacy

Itis important to reflect on our important roles as teachers.Assessment should be made integral in teaching practice. The surveyof assessment was collected to measure the sound and unsoundassessment practices. Aassessmenttakes both systematic and non-systematic approach to collection ofinformation to understand the place of the teacher in enhancingliteracy (Kahl, Hofman, and Bryant, 2013). The current one was toenhance literacy in assessment practices. Partone of the assessment was on personal assessment literacy to identifyareas of strength and weaknesses. The data was collected andsystematically analyzed using Microsoft Office excel software toobtain data measurements. In the survey, the section on “generalconsideration” had the lowest score of 2.94 while “during testadministration” was highest with a perfect mean of 5. When it comesto “prior to test begin”, the mean was 3.09. “Writing the test”had 3.5 and after test had 4.4. This is represented graphically asshown in fig. 1 bellow

Theresults of the personal survey of assessment literacy part one showedthat my strongest area was during test administration.

Figure1: Personal Assessment Literacy Averages

Fig1: Personal Assessment Literacy

Fromthe graph, my strongest area is during the test. I understand thecrucial role of the test and what the learners go through during thetest. Tests are important when it comes to ensuring that there isquality in delivery of content as they provide a yardstick ofteacher’s activities. Providing a conducive test environment fortests is a motivation that supports better performance which meansthat I am more likely to get a true reflection of the learner’scomprehension in the lessons. To have a conducive test environmentrequires early preparation. I always begin the process atpsychological level by informing the learner about the test andasking them about their expectations and preferred workingenvironment during the test. Using this information, I usuallyimprovise and stimulate the environment to as much as possible matchthe learner’s expectations.

Analyzing,judging and subjecting the teaching processes to vigor’s assessmentare affected by the subjective and objective factors(Popham,&nbsp2011). Therefore the weaknesses are to be looked at objectively. I cannotjudge myself very harshly when is comes to areas that I scored belowmy expectations. Mymain area of weakness was on general consideration. After completingthe assessment, I understood that I had a problem with understandingthe nature of performance assessment as I score one in this area.This was an eye opener and I appreciate the need to revise ondesigning holistic and analytic rubrics and if possible attend anin-service course relating to this area. I will also create time tosit down with my mentors, role models and professionals who are wellversed and experienced in this area for guidance. To achieve thisgoal, I will work diligently.

Part2 of the survey school survey of assessment literacy.

Therewas only one section of criteria for the school survey. In thecriteria, the average mean stood at 3.5 in a scale of 1 to 5which isabove average. The school performs very well when it comes tostandards of teaching learning and assessment, balancing of theassessment, curriculum and instruction and recognition of thestudent’s emotional connection to the assessment. The lowest scorewas at two implying that the school performed fair in the followingareas distinguishing between sound and unsound assessment, use ofdistrict or school-developed common assessment to be used every weekfor assessing and identification of areas of instructions that needimprovement and understanding the concept of assessment for learning.Since only one section of the criteria was used, the graph will onlyhighlight the disparities in the highest and lowest score.Measurement is important in gathering quantitative data, to givespecific characterization of an individual in numbers(Popham,&nbsp2011).The main disadvantage of the test is the fact that predictability islimited to the context of use(Scarino,&nbsp2013). This one is more pronounced when there was alack of range of assessment items.

Fig.2: graph showing disparities in the highest and lowest scored item.The items are numbered basing on the position in the assessmentcriteria.

Self-assessmentis very important in ensuring standards of teaching are met. I foundthe process beneficial as I was able to reflect on the objectives ofthe assessment and the results. I was also able to identify areasthat I do well and areas that I aim to improve on. This means that Iam assessment-literate and I have the ability to interpretself-administered surveys. Ilearnt a number of important areas in personal assessment literacyand school assessment practices as a takeaway.

References

Kahl,S. R., Hofman, P., &amp Bryant, S. (2013). Assessment literacystandards and performance measures for teacher candidates andpracticing teachers. Prepared for the Council for Accreditation ofEducator Preparation. Dover, NH: Measured Progress.

Popham,&nbspW.&nbspJ.(2011). Assessment Literacy Overlooked: A Teacher Educator`sConfession.&nbspTheTeacher Educator,&nbsp46(4),265-273. doi:10.1080/08878730.2011.605048

Scarino,&nbspA.(2013). Language assessment literacy as self-awareness: Understandingthe role of interpretation in assessment and in teacherlearning.&nbspLanguageTesting.doi:10.1177/0265532213480128

References

ContinuousCapacity Building: Data-Driven Decision-Making Skills and PedagogicalData Literacy. (n.d.).&nbspTransformingTeaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making,89-116. doi:10.4135/9781506335568.n5

Kahl,S. R., Hofman, P., &amp Bryant, S. (2013). Assessment literacystandards and performance measures for teacher candidates andpracticing teachers. Prepared for the Council for Accreditation ofEducator Preparation. Dover, NH: Measured Progress.

Popham,&nbspW.&nbspJ.(2011). Assessment Literacy Overlooked: A Teacher Educator`sConfession.&nbspTheTeacher Educator,&nbsp46(4),265-273. doi:10.1080/08878730.2011.605048

Scarino,&nbspA.(2013). Language assessment literacy as self-awareness: Understandingthe role of interpretation in assessment and in teacherlearning.&nbspLanguageTesting.doi:10.1177/0265532213480128