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Transgressions and the Politics of Porn

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Transgressionsand the Politics of Porn

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Transgressionsand the Politics of Porn

Thechapter about transgressions and the politics of porn analyses themovie, Inthe Realm of the Senses,retells areal life story of Sada who murdered her lover in the 1930’sfollowing an adoring love affair. The author of the article begins byrestating what was reported in the Japan Weekly Chronicle concerningthe arrest of Sada on the charges of murder and mutilation of thebody belonging to his lover Ishuda1.As she was being arrested, she was found with the genitals of heronce lover, Kichi, in addition to the knife that she used to killher. The issue of romance is illustrated as a means that remedied theoverestimation, during the war era, the sacrificed that was made byindividuals for the overall good of the entire group.

Themain argument being presented in the article concerns the need forthe heroes to overcome their weakness that presents itself in both anemotional and physical manner for them to achieve a higher spiritualstate. Heroes get involved with women in their daily activities andthe tests associated with romance signify the emotional softness thatthey need to overcome to become real warriors. Therefore, women aredepicted as an outward sign of the feminine side of heroes that hasto be turned down as part the “rite of passage” to full manhoodand triumph as a warrior2.

Whatare the Implications?

Theimplication of these arguments was the development of the politics oftransgression since the film posed as a challenge to the infamousJapanese obscenity law in addition to the symbolic configuration ofthe nation’s patriarchal authority. In that, the film risked givingthe masculinity of men a different meaning of weakness through thedepiction of the penis that had been chopped off because it wasearlier viewed as a symbol of the phallus.

HowWas the Argument Made?

Inmaking the argument, the author had to bring the earlier meaning ofmasculinity in the Japanese political environment in addition to thedepiction of romance that presented challenges to men towards theirdesire to become real warriors within the society. In that, therigidities of the Japanese culture had to be illuminated from thepolitical arena where masculinity was adored to the film industrywhere directors were required to adhere to the laws or riskcensorship if they violate them. After depicting these rigidities,the author showed how the film went ahead to disrupt the status quobeginning from the way the director sought Western assistance in notonly shooting the movie but also developing it, thus freeingdirectors. The evidence depicted in coming up with the argument isbecause most of the people who wanted were given tickets to hear thecase were government officials. Very few members of the public hadaccess to these tickets, which showed the rigidity of the Japaneseculture3.

Inconclusion, the argument made in the article was compelling becauseit is backed by evidence and quotes from renowned scholars likeStandish and Slaymaker. The rules that had been put in place torestrict directors in Japan from shooting such films clearly show whythe argument was important at that time. Japan had become a nationwhere sexual expression was restricted in various ways with theexample of the films produced by Kimashiro that could not be shown inpublic because of the need of hiding pubic hair.

Bibliography

Phillips,Alastair, and Julian Stringer, eds.&nbspJapanesecinema: texts and contexts.Routledge, 2007.

1 Phillips, Alastair, and Julian Stringer, eds.&nbspJapanese cinema: texts and contexts. Routledge, 2007.

2 Phillips, Alastair, and Julian Stringer, eds.&nbspJapanese cinema: texts and contexts. Routledge, 2007.

3 Phillips, Alastair, and Julian Stringer, eds.&nbspJapanese cinema: texts and contexts. Routledge, 2007.