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Zhiqi Peng

Peng 2

Dr. Amy L. Montz

ENG 201.01

11/8/16

Social Media Implications onHigher Learning

Social media in the modern e-society, not excluding the institutionsof learning, is gaining momentum at a fast pace. Generally, Olsson(193) claims it plays a critical role in community building,collaboration, sharing, and participation. It employs web-centeredand mobile innovations to establish increased interactiveenvironments where people and communities discus, alter, and shareuser-developed content. These forms of interaction occur faster andeffectively reach a wide range of community groups making itadvantageous when dealing with many people. Higher institutions oflearning have recognized these benefits making them consider theplatform as a perfect learning tool. Accordingly, multipleuniversities today have developed social sites that allow theirstudents to access class notes even without attending the actuallessons (Olsson, 194). Itmakes the process of learning easier as the students can conducttheir activities and perform their studies at flexible times. Socialmedia use among the learners offers more constructive thandestructive effects.

In learning institutions, Olsson notes social media allows thepresent students to carrying out both their school and leisure timedaily activities such as research and interactions in a relaxedmanner (196). They canresearch on numerous topics to enhance their social mediacommunications through sharing and gain sufficiently from theavailable data in the platforms that range from pictures and messagesto class notes and news updates among others. For instance, thestudents can enjoy learner-instructor and learner-learner connectionson some social platforms such as Twitter at the comfort of their roombut still receive lesson instructions and broad scopes of ideas. Itis even possible to share learning materials among variousinstitutions offering similar courses. Lecturers can also pass theirclass lineup information through such platforms. Therefore, socialmedia has advanced the electronic learning levels making learningeasier for students, instructors, and lecturers alike.

Oppositional Visual Rhetoric

However, students experience the negativities of using social media.Often, some learners utilize these sites to bully and tint theircolleagues` image, which results in devastating effects. The issuesof cyber bullying are quite evident where individuals leak otherperson’s sensitive conversations or even photos with the aim ofhumiliating them among their peers (Olsson,196). Further, digital hackers illegally access people’ssocial media platform accounts and post humiliating information orderive sensitive data about the individual. Social media containsirrelevant information that is distracting to the students making itan invention that should experience a cautious approach to avoidunsuitable consequences.

Social Reflection

The utilization of social media platforms among learners attractsmixed reactions from the public and intellectuals. A high percentageof individuals advocate for its use as a learning aid, while othersperceive it as a factor that should be avoided in the curriculum(Olsson, 193). While theworld is slowly turning to a digital village, the social mediaantagonists are losing their ground as extended benefits are beingderived from its utilization (Olsson,196). Presently, most of these arenas are customizable.Therefore, it would be inaccurate for people to assume that thesocial media integration into learning institution curriculums canlead to adverse effects.

Annotated Bibliography

Chen, Xin, Mihaela Vorvoreanu, and Krishna Madhavan. &quotMiningsocial media data for understanding students’ learningexperiences.&quot IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies,vol. 7, no. 3, 2014, pp. 246-259.

Chen, Mihaela and Krishna analyzed the manner by which social mediacan inform researchers about the student’s learning experiences,feelings and concerns. Their study focused on investigating Tweetspresented by the engineering learners. The complications experiencedby these students required both human interpretation and automaticdata analysis techniques to get a conclusive result. They appliedboth qualitative and quantitative techniques that added onto theresearch’s suitability. The article had sufficient data analysisincluding that from Purdue University that enhanced the viability ofthe study making it original because they depended on primary data.

Tavernier, Royette, and Teena Willoughby. &quotSleep problems:predictor or outcome of media use among emerging adults atuniversity?&quot Journal of sleep research, vol. 23, no.4,2014, pp. 389-396.

Tavernier and Teena conducted a three years longitudinalinvestigation to evaluate the connection between social media andreduced sleep time, as well as, sleeping problems among the students.They conducted a survey of 942 university students. The studyconfirmed a statistically significant association between sleepproblems and the use of social media. Tavernier and Teena concludethat sleep problems are a prediction of longer hours spent on socialmedia and not the other way round. It indicated that intellectualsuse social media to cope with sleep problems. The study providessufficient information and insights essential for my investigation.

DeAndrea, David C., et al. &quotSerious social media: On theuse of social media for improving students` adjustment to college.&quotThe Internet and higher education, vol. 15, no. 1, 2012, pp.15-23

Deandrea conducted an analysis on how social media enhances theperception of institutional support, among the students, beforeenrolling at the institution. This study concluded that social mediaincreased the student’s perceptions of acquiring different supportin the system once they have enrolled for the first semester.However, this investigation was shallow and did not inform my studyon the effects of the use of the invention.

Wang, Zheng, John M. Tchernev, and Tyler Solloway. &quotA dynamiclongitudinal examination of social media use, needs, andgratifications among college students.&quot Computers in HumanBehavior, vol. 28, no. 5, 2012, pp. 1829-1839

Wang, John, and Tyler conducted an analysis of the various socialmedia uses and effects on the gratification of the student’s lives.The study applied experience-sampling information collected over afour-month period. The inquiry concluded that student participationon social media was highly influenced by their emotional, cognitive,social and habitual factors. Social media does not gratify all theneeds, and they accumulate prompting its subsequent use. Theinvestigation provided a shallow explanation concerning the studentpresence on social media. It only explores the reasons for its usemaking it shallow for my assessment.

Sponcil, Megan, and Priscilla Gitimu. &quotUse of social media bycollege students: Relationship to communication and self-concept.&quotJournal of Technology Research, no. 4, 2013, pp. 1

Sponcil and Priscilla analyzed the college students’ engagement insocial media and evaluated its influence on communication andself-concept. The evaluation mainly used questionnaires to collectdata about the individual communication practices. It concluded thatthere was a profound relationship between social media employment,communication, and self-concept. Moreover, it provided sufficientinformation to understand the increased adoption of media among thestudents.

Conclusion

The popularity of social media in the society increases withtechnological advancements (Olsson,194). Employing social media among the students offers bothpositive and adverse effects howbeit, the merits outweigh demeritsmaking social media an overall pearl to the society.

Works Cited

Chen, Xin, Mihaela Vorvoreanu, and Krishna Madhavan. &quotMiningsocial media data for understanding students’ learningexperiences.&quot IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies,vol. 7, no. 3, 2014, pp. 246-259.

DeAndrea, David C., et al. &quotSerious social media: On theuse of social media for improving students` adjustment to college.&quotThe Internet and higher education, vol. 15, no. 1, 2012, pp.15-23

Olsson, Hanna M. &quotTowards ways to promote interaction in digitallearning spaces.&quot Open and Social Technologies for NetworkedLearning. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2013, pp. 193-196&nbsp

Sponcil, Megan, and Priscilla Gitimu. &quotUse of social media bycollege students: Relationship to communication and self-concept.&quotJournal of Technology Research, no. 4, 2013, pp. 1

Tavernier, Royette, and Teena Willoughby. &quotSleep problems:predictor or outcome of media use among emerging adults atuniversity?&quot Journal of sleep research, vol. 23, no.4,2014, pp. 389-396.

Wang, Zheng, John M. Tchernev, and Tyler Solloway. &quotA dynamiclongitudinal examination of social media use, needs, andgratifications among college students.&quot Computers in HumanBehavior, vol. 28, no. 5, 2012, pp. 1829-1839